How the Dead Survive

My story collection, How the Dead Survive, is now available as a Kindle Edition on Amazon! I’m very excited to share this collection of three stories about cults, murder, and ghosts in the Midwest with everyone.

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Truth or Dare: On Visibility

The visibility of LGBTQ people, and especially LGBTQ writers, is very important. As writers we get to tell stories that can let people know they are not alone. Over at Luna Luna Magazine is my essay “Truth or Dare: On Visibility”. It’s about growing up queer in the Midwest in the early nineties and why I think the visibility of LGBTQ writers and educators is vital.

This essay is part of a LGBTQ visibility project where editor, Ruben Quesada is looking “to feature LGBTQ histories of the past, present, and future.” I’m happy to have had the chance to tell my story. Now, I encourage you to tell yours.

LGBTQ Friendly Graduate Creative Writing Programs

Ruben Quesada recognized the need for a resource to help LGBTQ writers looking to attend graduate school to identify creative writing programs that would be LGBTQ friendly. He asked me to help compile the list, and I was more than happy to do so.

“How did we evaluate them, you might ask? We believe that visibility is the first step to creating a welcoming, friendly environment for LGBTQ students, faculty, staff, and the content of a writer’s work at any institution of higher education.”

What we’ve put together will hopefully help people when researching grad school options, as well as open up a discussion about LGBTQ friendly programs. The list can be found here at Luna Luna Magazine.

Vermont Studio Center

Thank you to everyone who donated and helped spread the word about my campaign to get to the Vermont Studio Center! I’m thrilled to report that I am going to Vermont. I’m humbled by all the support.

Update #1: Thanks to everyone who has donated so far and is helping spread the word. I appreciate all the support more than I can say.

Update #2: My essay, “Cultland” is now available to read here. It’s about the mythology of Kirtland, where my novel is set, and the Lundgren cult, which is the basis for the cult in the book.

I have the honor of being accepted to the prestigious and highly selective Vermont Studio Center for a two week residency in November. They have given me an artist grant to cover a portion of the fees associated with attending, which is very much appreciated, but it does not cover all of the costs. I’ve started a GoFundMe campaign to raise money to cover the rest of the fees associated with attending the residency as well travel costs. More information is available on my campaign page.

I hope you’ll consider donating. If you can’t, it would be great if you could help me spread the word about the campaign by sharing it with your friends. Thank you!

 

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The Conversant

My discussion with Justin Lawrence Daugherty about homophobia and the need for space for diverse voices in the indie lit community is now available on The Conversant. Lack of inclusion is far more prevalent in the indie lit community than people might think. I’m glad to have had the chance for this discussion to take place (thanks to Rosebud Ben-Oni for facilitating it). There need to be more of them. Hopefully, this is a start.

LGBTQ Cinema

My essay on LGBTQ cinema, “A Place to Exist: Breaking Out of the Celluloid Closet,” is now live at The Philadelphia Review of Books!  

Below is more information/links to the LGBTQ film festivals I mention in the piece:

The Reel It UP LGBT Film Festival (June, Urbana-Champaign) is organized by The Up Center of Champaign, a local LGBTQ advocacy group, and shown at the local independent theatre, The Art. The Art already does an excellent job of showing a variety of films from documentaries to comedies to dramas. Hosting the Reel It UP Film Festival not only increases the visibility of these films, but it also dedicates a space to LGBTQ stories in a theater that draws people from all different parts of the Urbana-Champaign community.

The Indianapolis LGBT Film Festival (November 8-10) is held at the Indianapolis Museum of Art right in the heart of the city. It is not hidden away in some out of the way location. It’s a signal that it is providing a significant and easily accessible space for all to enjoy these films. The films already announced for this year’s festival range from a documentary about the legendary Divine, the horror movie spoof, Chastity Bites, as well as G.B.F., which pokes fun at the gay best friend stereotype, and James Franco’s Interior. Leather Bar. This film inspired by the rumor of 40 minutes of explicit material deleted from Cruising, a 1980 thriller about a serial killer targeting gay men in New York City. While a review from Variety says the movie is more of a stunt than a serious examination of homophobia in movies and how the culture has changed since Cruising was released, it’s interesting that a mainstream star like James Franco would even attempt such a feat. If more actors with mainstream followers were to explore such topics, it’s possible Hollywood will believe the audience will follow, giving a greater chance to LGBTQ themes and positive depictions being incorporated into bigger budget films.

The Reeling 2013: The 31st Chicago LGBT International Film Festival, (November 7-14) as the name suggests, is focused on international films. The 2011 festival showcased films from countries such as Brazil, South Africa, and India. The expansion from US only films to global locales only further reinforces how varied, yet universal, LGBTQ stories can be.

The Milwaukee LGBT Film/Video Festival, (October 17-20) organized by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Film Department, has in previous years, put an emphasis on films of the LGBTQ experience in a mix of different cultures. The representation of cultural diversity is just as important in LGBTQ films as it would be for any other.

There are some interesting looking films playing at these festivals, so hopefully you’ll have a chance to check them out.